Replica Guide Trusted Dealers Jaeger-LeCoultre Orologio Master Control Memovox Reveil 141.8.97

Conservatism doesn’t necessarily imply timidity, and many smart companies understand very well that providing your clients a direct, tangible relationship with the past is a fantastic way to construct a feeling of emotional connection to the present (as a matter of reality, Rolex has built an entire business model on the idea of, if not a intentionally glacial product development cycle, at a keen sense of if something isn’t broken, and, thus, not needing fixing). Watches such as the Speedmaster Moonwatch along with the Zenith El Primero are in need of no fiddling, and the two of those special watches show just how much longevity a fantastic motion in a great design can really have. In precisely the same class is another, slightly-less-often discussed wristwatch: that the Jaeger-LeCoultre Memovox.The Memovox of course was not the first alarm wristwatch — that honour goes to Eterna, who revived the earliest known alarm wristwatch in 1908, also through time, other companies attempted to get into the match with varying degrees of success, before at last Vulcain started making the Cricket at 1947, which can be quite loud and readily capable of awakening a sound sleeper. (Breguet got around the issue of making a portable alarm loudly loudly having an alert ring-watch, amount 4952, that was purchased by Comte Charles de L’Espine of France in 1830; this ring-watch functioned by pricking the owner’s finger with a tiny needle at the appointed time, which seems equally effective and anxiety-provoking; the thought, for obvious reasons, has not yet been imitated.) The very first Memovox, using a hand-wound movement, appeared in 1950 and while it doesn’t create a particularly loud noise on the wrist, placed off the wrist, it is pretty darned loud.

  • The Memovox in both hand-wound and automatic formats proved to be a remarkably popular watch for JLC and it stays in the catalogue today; there have been hiatuses in manufacturing but complete, for the past 66 years it’s generally been available. It’s also been made in a quite vast array of layouts, from exquisite, very slim hand-wound models to the renowned Le Coultre Deep Sea Alarm (a Memovox in all but name). The latter is becoming really expensive (a inexpensive way to pick one up would be to pay $5.99 for a single hidden in a basket of broken quartz watches in a Goodwill, such as this man) but generally speaking, classic Memovoxes are still fairly cheap, and enjoyable, to collect.On vintage models it is often possible to see that the point on the caseback in which a snare’s been soldered to the interior of the case; the pin carries vibrations from the alert to the caseback, amplifying the sound.The Memovox as it exists in the current catalogue is part of the Master collection (Master as in Master Control) and can be offered in a single model, which is quite dressier than not, also comes from either steel, for $10,300pink or pink stone, for $22,000. It is a fine watch but as is normally true with Jaeger-LeCoultre there is a veritable treasure trove of designs in the background of this Memovox (JLC has nothing if not an embarrassment of wealth history to draw from, both visually and technically) and for the dial design, JLC’s gone back to the famous and somewhat rare (only about 2,000 made) “Snowdrop” Memovox, by the 1970s. The Snowdrop is a somewhat rare variant of the Memovox as we noted when we found one in Bring A Loupe long ago. As Louis Westphalen wrote in that story, the Snowdrop used the grade 916, which was a full-rotor automated motion, unlike earlier versions of this Memovox. The very first automated Memovox movement was that the grade 815, which was a bumper-wind automatic. (Such motions have rotors which don’t swing through a full circle; instead, at every extreme limit of an arc, the Cable pops off a bumper spring.) The Master Memovox Boutique Edition also bears a pretty strong resemblance to another blue-dialed model from 1970, using the exact same automatic caliber 916 that is found from the Snowdrop.

  • The alarm tone is noticeably quieter if it rings when the watch is about the wrist. This implies that if you want to use the watch in the office to remind you about a scheduled appointment, you should not worry that its chiming will bother your coworkers. Additionally, you won’t need to pay attention to this metallic rasping and tinny grating characteristic of several alarm watches. The Master Memovox doesn’t make sound: it generates mellifluous sounds. Its tone is similar to the ringing of an old-fashioned phone, but rather than sounding in intervals, it rings continuously for 18 minutes — about the same period of time as the alerts in other well-known alert watches. The connection between the true alarm period and the set alarm time also stays within the standard limitation of one to two minutes.Some other alarm watches, such as other models from Jaeger-LeCoultre, offer alarm mechanisms which could be set with greater accuracy. This means that the wearer has to be happy with placing the wake-up time to a tolerance of 7.5 minutes. This level of precision is high enough for a morning wake-up call, but when the wearer had been utilizing his watch to remind him of an appointment during the company day, he would be advised to set the alarm to ring a few minutes early.The alarm-time scale, which encircles a rotatable disk in the middle of the dialup, doesn’t intrude upon the dial’s harmonious appearance.

  • The present time is always clearly discernible, and the date display, within a window at the wreath of hour indices around the periphery of the dial, can also be perfectly legible. But to read the time in the dim, the wearer must hold the thin strips of luminous material on the hands up to a light source soon beforehand; otherwise the luminescence is restricted to the extra index dots along with the alarm-time arrow.Jaeger-LeCoultre has provided a self-winding alarm motion since 1956. The separate barrel to power the alarm mechanism must be manually wound employing an additional crown in the two o’clock position. After winding, the wearer can pull this crown out and flip it in one way to set the alarm time in another direction to place the date. This remedy is simple and very useful: after all, a little turn in the wrong direction could set the alarm time inadvertantly or worse, clutter the date display, which would need to be advanced through an entire cycle until it was again correct.The quick-adjustment mechanism for the date display clicks very exactly into position. This user-friendly feature makes up to the slow-moving date disk, which stays slanted inside its own window for two hours per evening. The most important crown at 4 o’clock can be used to manually wind the most important movement and to place the hour and second hands.

  • The Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Memovox was developed to keep time around the wrist and double as an alarm clock on the nightstand. In this test attribute from our archives, writer Alexander Krupp sees how the modern variant of the watch performs both tasks.If you love elegant watches, you’re guaranteed to be attracted to the outward look of Jaeger-LeCoultre’s Master Memovox, which debuted in January 2010. Its immaculately created, rose-gold case harmonizes using a silver-colored dial along with a dark brownish alligator-skin strap, which is secured to the wrist with a flat, double-folding clasp that accentuates the slick classicism of the entire ensemble. The dial’s outstanding craftsmanship is evident in its brushed surface, paper-thin printed lettering and one-hundred indices. We couldn’t help noticing that the engravings on the caseback, which surround the raised-relief emblem, are positioned irregularly so that one-third of its periphery remains clean.It’s really what’s within the Master Memovox that makes it special. Under the huge caseback ticks among the more than 1,000 mechanical calibers that Jaeger-LeCoultre has developed in the course of its own 177-year history — and also one of approximately 40 that are still being used. Automatic Caliber 956 premiered in 2008 to electricity the Memovox Polaris alarm wristwatch for sailors. This movement was used within the very first Memovox, which has been introduced at the Basel watch fair in 1951. That watch’s unique feature was its own alarm, which rang considerably louder when it was lying flat on a hard surface, such as the wooden top of a table, than if it had been on the wearer’s wrist. This meant the watch could be used as an effective substitute for a tabletop alarm clock. Jaeger-LeCoultre has refined this useful feature, which many other wristwatch alarms lacked, over time, and the opinion has also evolved, with the present model being the most recent.

  • Like I said above, this Memovox is just plain fun to wear (a thought frequently ignored when talking about whether a watch should be in your to-acquire list). On a thin strap, such as the HODINKEE unlined shell cordovan you see in these pictures, it wear very light and simple, and it makes the transition from casual to formal. I wore it with everything from a t shirt into a suit and tie, and it looked great in each situation.There are a few other alarm watch choices out there, both classic and contemporary. A watch like the one you see here, with a crisp scenario, two first signed tiles, and a clean dial will be on the top end of the, but we could figure around $2,500 for the sake of comparison.To get your hands on a modern mechanical alarm watch, you are taking a look at a considerably higher price tag than $2,500. The Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Memovox comes in at $10,700 in steel and will be the most obvious contemporary analog to what we’ve got here. There are also an Assortment of Vulcain Cricket versions, in Addition to the Tudor Advisor. The Vulcain choices can be great options if you would like a nautical diving alarm or an alarm together with other complications, even whereas the Tudor Advisor has a rather modern on/off system at a bigger 42mm case. For some of them though, you’re looking at spending as much as three times what you would pay for a classic Memovox.

  • It’s definitely an anachronism but first of all so is telling period using a balance along with a mainspring, and secondly, it’s part of the appeal. The Memovox is a reminder that once upon a time, we might have used written agendas, recorded memoranda using a Dictaphone, written with fountain pens and delivered messages abroad by cablegram, however there is a leisurely deliberateness about placing an alarm by hand, and waking up to its mechanical stridulations, making the Memovox (to paraphrase Obi-Wan Kenobi) a tasteful alert, for a more civilized age.By now you are probably familiar with our A Week On The Wrist reviews, where we provide a thorough look at the background and technical details of a watch while also describing what it’s like to actually use the watch. But we know you are not just interested in modern watches, therefore this is actually the first of many future per week On The Wrist reviews appearing at classic classics. To start things off, I required a trans-Atlantic trip with the first automated alarm watch, the Jaeger-LeCoultre Memovox.The mechanical alarm is an underrated complication. So out of a pure usefulness perspective, the mechanical alarm is a bit behind the times. When it comes to allure however, there’s nothing like a mechanical alarm wristwatch.Alarm clocks return millennia — and that is not just hyperbole. There’s speculation that even the early Greeks had water clocks rigged to fall ring gongs, and activate all manner of other noise-making mechanisms. The alert we all know now is in fact based on comparatively simple mechanisms: a barrel is wrapped, storing energy, and when a specific period is attained, that energy is discharged, turning a equipment that rapidly moves a hammer back and forth against a resonating chamber, gong, or bell. Pretty straightforward, right?

  • Like I said above, this Memovox is just plain fun to put on (a consideration often dismissed when talking about whether or not a watch should be on your own to-acquire list). On a thin strap, like the HODINKEE unlined shell cordovan you see in these pictures, it wear really light and easy, and it makes the transition from casual to formal seamlessly. I wore it with everything from a tee shirt to a suit and tie, and it seemed great in every situation.There are a few other alarm watch choices out there, both vintage and contemporary. A watch like the one you see here, with a crisp case, two first signed tiles, and also a clean dial will be on the top end of the, but we could guess about $2,500 for the sake of comparison.To get your hands on a modern mechanical alarm watch, you are looking at a considerably higher price tag than $2,500. The Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Memovox comes in at $10,700 in steel and is the very evident modern analog to what we’ve got here. There are also an Assortment of Vulcain Cricket models, in Addition to the Tudor Advisor. The Vulcain choices can be great choices if you would like a nautical diving alarm or an alarm combined with different complications, even whereas the Tudor Advisor has a rather modern on/off system at a bigger 42mm case. For any of them though, you’re looking at spending up to three times what you’d pay for a classic Memovox.

  • Alright, now that we have my general compliments from the way, let’s have a better look at exactly what it is like to wear the Memovox. It is possible to use the alarm for just about any daily reminder, however, travel seemed like a great way to check a watch like this. Throughout a yearlong excursion abroad, I used the Memovox rather than my trusty iPhone to alert me to my dressing occasions, dinner appointments, and even to wake up in the morning.I’m a pretty heavy sleeper, so I will admit I was skeptical going into this evaluation. Multiple backup alarms were put, as I didn’t plan on missing flights or unintentionally waking in the name of horological rigor. But just once were these back-ups needed. As it’s such a clearly analog alarm noise, I believe my entire body was additional attentive. An alarm does not necessarily need to be the loudest, it just has to be the ideal sound for your job. The majority of us are so used to the digital beeps of more contemporary solutions, so the Memovox gets your attention. Whether this could dull with time, I can’t say.For daytime alerts, such as letting myself know when to run from one place to the next or when to meet a colleague for lunch, the Memovox was infinitely more agreeable than using that ever-present phone. Rather than having the alarm loudly go off, needing me to pull out my phone, turn it off, and irritate everybody in the surrounding region, I had a much more personal solution at hand. The Memovox on the wrist is not anywhere near as loud as a telephone, but the vibrations capture your focus set of the loud sound. Sure, it will make a noticeable sound, but unless you’re in a quiet place — library, theater, etc. — no one will be set off.

  • Details

    Basic Info

    Brand Jaeger-LeCoultre
    Model Master Memovox
    Ref. No. 141.8.97
    Chrono24-ID 4xfqv1
    Code 6443
    Movement Automatic
    Case material Steel
    Year 2003
    Condition 1 (mint)
      With box
      With papers
    Location Italy, Milano
    Price 4,350 € (= $5,192)
    Availability Available now

    Caliber

    Movement Automatic

    Case

    Case material Steel
    Case diameter 39 mm

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    Description

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    Jaeger Le Coultre Master Control Memovox Reveil 141.8.97
    Steel
    Automatic movement
    39 millimeters
    Year 2003
    Condition: 1 (excellent)
    inner box Jaeger Le Coultre [yes]
    Warranty [yes] Jaeger Le Coultre
    € 4350.00

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